How do I sew a button

sew a button

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It is not uncommon for buttons to come loose from clothing, all the better if you know how to sew them back on.

Required work equipment and tools:

  • Tape measure,
  • Stud,
  • the right sewing thread,
  • Sewing needle,
  • Scissors.

First find the correct position for your button. If a button that has fallen off is replaced, you can usually see where it was sewn on. The replacement button is sewn in the same place. You can also use a tape measure to measure the distance between two buttons and sew on the replacement button at the same distance. Another option is to close the surrounding buttons and then poke a pin through the empty buttonhole. Sew the replacement button where the pin went in.

Then fix the sewing thread to the fabric. In the first, somewhat less elegant type, a knot is simply tied at the end of the thread to prevent the sewing thread from slipping through (Figure 1). However, this knot is still visible later.

Figure 1: If a knot prevents slipping, it can still be seen later.Figure 2: Guide the thread between the layers of fabric.
Figure 1: If a knot prevents slipping, it can still be seen later.
Figure 2: Guide the thread between the layers of fabric.

The second, more elegant variant is only possible with thicker fabrics or two layers of fabric. However, the button panels on most blouses, shirts, and T-shirts have multiple layers of fabric. The needle is inserted a little away from the position where the button should sit and then the thread is guided invisibly between the layers of fabric to the desired location (Figure 2). Pull on the thread until you can no longer see the end. Then fix the thread by sewing a loop (Figures 3 and 4).

Figure 3: Fixing the threadFigure 4: The thread does not slip through the loop.
Figure 3: Fixing the thread
Figure 4: The thread does not slip through the loop.

The actual sewing on of the button can now begin. To do this, the thread is pulled through one of the buttonholes, then back through the next, then through the fabric and again through the buttonhole and so on (Figure 5). The button should be sewn as close as possible to the fabric so that the thread is not under tension when buttoned. The easiest way to keep the distance is to put a finger between the button and the fabric (Figure 6).

Figure 5: Sewing the buttonFigure 6: Distance between button and fabric
Figure 5: Sewing the button
Figure 6: Distance between button and fabric

Over time, the threads form a flexible web (Figure 7). After the button has been sufficiently fastened with a few stitches, the thread is allowed to come out between the fabric and the button and the thread is wrapped around the bridge (Figure 8).

Figure 7: The distance is maintained while sewing.Figure 8: The thread is now wrapped around the web.
Figure 7: The distance is maintained while sewing.
Figure 8: The web is now wrapped with the thread.

This makes the bridge tighter and maintains the space between the fabric and the button (Figure 9).

Figure 9: the finished barFigure 10: Parallel arrangement of the stitches
Figure 9: the finished bar
Figure 10: Parallel arrangement of the stitches

If the button has four holes, sew the button on with parallel or diagonal stitches. These form two parallel lines next to each other, a square or a cross (Figure 10 + 11). If buttons are already available, simply use the variant of the other buttons.

Figure 11: Square and crossed arrangement of the stitchesFigure 12: A knot prevents the thread from loosening again.
Figure 11: Square and crossed arrangement of the stitches
Figure 12: A knot prevents the thread from loosening again.

Finally, the thread is knotted on the back of the fabric (Figure 12). Now, as at the beginning, let the thread come out at a slightly distant point and cut it (Figure 13). The end of the thread disappears between the layers of fabric and can no longer be seen afterwards.

Figure 13: Cut the thread close to the fabric so that the thread end disappears between the layers of fabric.Figure 14: Buttons with a bar can be sewn on without a gap.
Figure 13: Cut the thread close to the fabric so that the thread end disappears between the layers of fabric.
Figure 14: Buttons with a bar can be sewn on without a gap.

As Figure 14 shows, there are also buttons to which a bar is already attached. Here the button can be sewn firmly to the fabric.

source

Lisa Comfort: How to sew on a button. theguardian.com, Monday May 19, 2014

Detailed references



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