Why do we use axioms in mathematics

Justify in math and math class

literature

Used literature

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Faculty of Mathematics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Thea-Leymann-Str. 9, 45127, Essen, Germany

    Hans Niels Jahnke

  2. Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Working Group Didactics and History of Mathematics, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, 42119, Wuppertal, Germany

    Ralf Krömer

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Hans Niels Jahnke.

Caption Electronic Supplementary Material

13138_2019_157_MOESM1_ESM.pdf

Sketch of two teaching examples for the essay “Justification in Mathematics and Mathematics Lessons” by Hans Niels Jahnke and Ralf Krömer