What is the Illuminati motto?

Freemasons, Illuminati and Co - secret societies then and now

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Secret and Conspiracy - Part I | This three-part series by our guest author Arno Meteling is about secret societies from then and now.

Dan Brown and the conspiracy theory

We know that Paul McCartney was not replaced by a doppelganger. We also don't seriously believe that Nazis lived on the dark side of the moon or that an alien spaceship crashed over Roswell, New Mexico.

Undoubtedly, however, conspiracy theories have always fueled the imagination of people - and at the center of suspicions are again and again secret powers that control world events from unseen. For many, the idea that only a few conspirators decide about important things in the world, be it about the global economy or the weather, seems almost irresistible.

The Prieuré de Sion, for example, has not only deceived historians: it is at the center of the conspiracy theory of Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh about the Holy Grail as the bloodline of Jesus Christ. The theory became known through the bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown, who specializes in secret societies - such as the Illuminati in Illuminati and the Freemasons in The Lost Symbol. The "symbologist" Robert Langdon, main character of the novels, is allowed to do exactly what all conspiracy theorists not only like to do, but actually define them: namely to decipher secret messages and go on a scavenger hunt.

Robert Langdon: The audio book series at Audible.de

Secret societies and secret societies

However, there are still real secret societies today. Like the Freemasons, most eighteenth-century societies have committed themselves primarily to the movement of the Enlightenment and thus to the spread of reason: Ironically, however, the sometimes necessary practice of secrecy has also brought esoteric aspects into many secret societies.

On the other hand, the Bavarian Order of Illuminati definitely no longer exists. Founded in 1776 by Adam Weishaupt, professor of canon law, in Ingolstadt, it was banned in 1785 and dissolved. The most important member of the secret society was, by the way, Adolph Freiherr Knigge, still known today for his book On Dealing with People.

Both secret societies are responsible for the production of countless books - non-fiction, literature and conspiracy theories. See for example:

The Freemasons

Written by: Michael Kraus
Voiced by: Wolfgang Riemerschmidt

Secret messages

It is precisely because the Illuminati no longer exist that they have become the darling of conspiracy theorists: They should not only be behind the French Revolution, but also work on the world conspiracy.

The Illuminati also seem to have left traces of their work everywhere in history: For example, on the American one-dollar bill. Is there really a portrait of George Washington on the front? Couldn't it be Adam Weishaupt too? On the back then the pyramid with the all-seeing eye - a sign of total surveillance. Keyword: Echelon. And what is the motto of the banknote? Of course “NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM” - the “New World Order”. Finally the foundation of the pyramid: The year "MDCCLXXVI" (1776) does not only designate the founding year of the United States, but also that of the Bavarian Illuminati!

Why are there conspiracy theories?

But why do many people still believe in the existence of powerful secret societies? Why do conspiracy theories work? At least two reasons are conceivable:

  1. They make the world easier: Because nothing is more reassuring than being able to blame certain people or groups.
  2. They make the world more complicated: How boring would a world be without secrets, without guesswork and without conspiracy thrillers?

But maybe none of this is true at all. Maybe we should only believe all of this because YOU want it that way. You never know.

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